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#HCSM Review - Sept. 19 Edition

The HCSM Review is a peer-reviewed blog carnival for everyone interested in health care social media. This edition is loosely based on the theme of motivation and how it plays into our roles as patients, providers and caregivers. 

Motivational Lessons
"I look back now and wonder how my working self would assess my own motivation and participation over the last few years. On a good day I'd be the perfect patient, self-motivated, engaged, determined. On a bad day I'd be the surly, non-compliant patient threatening to throw a cup (or worse) at my head. It's just luck of the draw." - Rusty Hoe, Living With Bob (Dysautonomia)

Lather Up: doctors resistant to patients’ requests for hand-washing
"As patients we need to learn to work with what is until doctors and nurses are more accustomed to working in partnership with patients." - Martine Ehrenclou

Blogging and the Experience of Cancer Survivorship
"The apparent randomness of a cancer diagnosis shakes your sense of identity to its very core and afterwards nothing will ever feel certain again. Friends and family may find it hard to comprehend why you are sad or depressed. Understandably your loved ones want you to put your cancer behind you, to get on with your life and move forward, but it isn’t so easy." - Marie Ennis O'Connor, Health Care Social Media Monitor

Other favorites from this week's blogosphere:

"Patient satisfaction can be broken down simply into two main issues… expectations and perceptions. Patients enter your office with a perception of the care or interaction they desire. They then decide if you met those expectations." - Howard J. Luks

Efficiency, Value, And Unexpected Consequences
"I settled into my morning routine, but couldn't shake the feeling that something was wrong... I entered the exam room to find my first patient anxiously clenching the exam table. Before I could open the chart, he began to sputter." - Jordan Grumet

"We need to focus on re-educating clinicians about how to partner with patients — how to elicit patient preferences, and how to anticipate when a decision is a preference-sensitive one. We also need to coach patients, to help them not only learn information relevant to their treatment choices but also to help them find ways of communicating their desires more effectively to their clinicians." - Peter Ubel

"When we feel love and kindness for others, it not only makes others feel loved and cared for, but it helps us also to develop inner happiness and peace." - The Dalai Lama

Look for next week's HCSM Review to be hosted by the venerable chancellor of SMUG (Social Media University Global), Lee Aase. 

Comments

  1. Great post.Great ideas for doctors using social media to market their services.

    Erick Kinuthia
    Team MDwebpro.com

    ReplyDelete

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"We are what we think. All that we are arises with our thoughts. With our thoughts, we make the world." — Buddha

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